Codrops Tutorial Demo

Image Highlighting and Preview with jQuery

Hover over an image to highlight it

Back to the Codrops Tutorial

In one part of this cellar we kept wines, liquors and provisions. From the rapidity of their disappearance we acquired the superstitious belief that the spirits of the persons buried there came at dead of night and held a festival. images/1.jpg It was at least certain that frequently of a morning we would discover fragments of pickled meats, canned goods and such d├ębris, littering the place, although it had been securely locked and barred against human intrusion. It was proposed to remove the provisions and store them elsewhere, but our dear mother, always generous and hospitable, said it was better to endure the loss than risk exposure: if the ghosts were denied this trifling gratification they might set on foot an investigation, which would overthrow images/2.jpg our scheme of the division of labor, by diverting the energies of the whole family into the single industry pursued by me--we might all decorate the cross-beams of gibbets. We accepted her decision with filial submission, due to our reverence for her wordly wisdom and the purity of her character.

On the incidents of our precipitate flight from that horrible place--on the extinction of all human sentiment in that tumultuous, mad scramble up the damp and mouldy stairs--slipping, falling, images/3.jpg pulling one another down and clambering over one another's back--the lights extinguished, babes trampled beneath the feet of their strong brothers and hurled backward to death by a mother's arm!--on all this I do not dare to dwell. My mother, my eldest brother and sister and I escaped; the others remained below, to perish of their wounds, or of their terror--some, perhaps, by flame. For within an hour we four, hastily gathering together what money and jewels we had and what clothing we could carry, fired the dwelling and fled by its light into the hills. images/4.jpg We did not even pause to collect the insurance, and my dear mother said on her death-bed, years afterward in a distant land, that this was the only sin of omission that lay upon her conscience. Her confessor, a holy man, assured her that under the circumstances Heaven would pardon the neglect.

All was clear. My father, whatever had caused him to be "taken bad" at his meal (and I think my sainted mother could have thrown some light upon that matter) had indubitably been buried alive. The grave having been accidentally dug above the forgotten drain, and down almost to the crown of its arch, and no coffin having been used, his struggles on reviving had broken the rotten masonry and he had fallen through, escaping finally into the cellar. Feeling that he was not welcome in his own house, yet having no other, he had lived in subterranean seclusion, a witness to our thrift and a pensioner on our providence. images/5.jpg It was he who had eaten our food; it was he who had drunk our wine--he was no better than a thief! In a moment of intoxication, and feeling, no doubt, that need of companionship which is the one sympathetic link between a drunken man and his race, he had left his place of concealment at a strangely inopportune time, entailing the most deplorable consequences upon those nearest and dearest to him--a blunder that had almost the dignity of crime.

Photos by paulobrandao